Most countries have legislation which brings various drugs and drug-like substances under the control of licensing systems. Typically this legislation covers any or all of the opiates, amphetamines, cannabinoids, cocaine, barbiturates, benzodiazepines, anesthetics, hallucinogenics, derivatives and a variety of more modern synthetic drugs. Unlicensed production, supply or possession is a criminal offence.
Rehabs.com is a comprehensive guide for the entire treatment process - from spotting issues to find and enrolling into rehabillation. Yet it’s more than that; it’s also an extensive educational resource that includes up to date statistics, policy and regulation information as well as a section on careers in the industry. If that’s not enough, this site also cover a list of hot button issues that can be found on the blog and in the infographics library.
Ecstasy, or MDMA, is classified as both a hallucinogenic drug and a stimulant. Like LSD, PCP, and other psychedelic substances, Ecstasy can alter your sensory perceptions and change the way you perceive time and space. This synthetic drug can also cause feelings of warmth, affection, and intimacy with others — properties that have inspired nicknames like “the Love Drug” and “the Hug Drug.” In addition, Ecstasy is a central nervous system stimulant, increasing energy and activity.
At this stage, you will have developed a problem with alcohol and will be drinking out of habit than choice. Your use may be starting to have an impact on other aspects of your life and you might be noticing problems with your moods and sleeping patterns. Nevertheless, you are probably still at the stage where you are enjoying alcohol and believe that it is making your life better.
As a person in long term recovery, He has been working to help people find recovery from addiction in some fashion for 12 + years either as a sponsor, mentor, or as a professional in clinical environments.  At CRTC he works to formulate practical, action-based plans to transition our clients into healthier states of mental and emotional processing.
Beyond the directory, Addiction Recovery Now also provides support in the form of a 24-hour hotline for answering all your questions about recovery. Our agents are compassionate, professional, and dedicated to serving you, not the rehabilitation centers.The agents at Addiction Recovery Now are well-educated in the industry and are waiting to put your mind at ease.
Sober living homes are best suited to those seeking transitional housing as they recover from a substance use disorder. Cost-effective, safe, sober and healthy environments provide a place to build strength in a recovery community and establish addiction recovery support groups. Outpatient Treatment is also provided at all Gateway Foundation Recovery Homes, so when it’s time to move forward, the skills and support network remain. Lessons a drug addict can teach you | Lauren Windle | TEDxSurreyUniversity
Frequent meetings with an alcohol counselor are important for individuals to communicate and receive guidance during their recovery. Counseling opens a line of communication during the good times, as well as the difficult times. Your therapist will also be able to work with you on any underlying issues that may be triggering your drinking problem such as peers, family relationships, work or other circumstances. This will give you an opportunity to learn more about yourself, as well as how to keep your body healthy both inside and out.
Substance abuse therapy: Used as a part of many inpatient and outpatient programs, therapy is one of the cornerstones of drug addiction treatment. Individual, group and family therapy help patients and their loved ones understand the nature and causes of addiction. Therapy teaches coping strategies and life skills needed to live a productive, sober life in the community. For individuals with a co-occurring mental illness, intensive psychotherapy can also address psychiatric symptoms and find the underlying issues that contribute to addiction. Inside Shalom House, Australia’s ‘strictest’ drug rehabilitation | Australian Story
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