With the help of professional drug treatment programs, a large number of addicts have learned to live meaningful, drug-free lives. Relapse rates among recovering opiate addicts are as high as 90 percent, according to a study published in the Irish Medical Journal; however, addicts in this study who completed an inpatient treatment program were more likely to avoid relapse and remain drug-free.

Frequent meetings with an alcohol counselor are important for individuals to communicate and receive guidance during their recovery. Counseling opens a line of communication during the good times, as well as the difficult times. Your therapist will also be able to work with you on any underlying issues that may be triggering your drinking problem such as peers, family relationships, work or other circumstances. This will give you an opportunity to learn more about yourself, as well as how to keep your body healthy both inside and out.
Withdrawal is medically supervised and supported by our on-site nurses. For certain cases, we make use of medical aids to render the process much easier and safer. For opiate withdrawals we use suboxone, and for Benzodiazepine withdrawal we follow a modified version of the Ashton protocol. Alcohol withdrawal is medically supervised and medication is given to eliminate the risk of seizure and stroke. We take every measure to ensure that this first, important stage towards drug addiction recovery is a comfortable and safe one. To find out more about the detox program at Searidge please call us at 1-866-777-9614.
Another factor to consider in choosing between inpatient and outpatient rehab options is whether you have a healthy and supportive home environment where your recovery will be a priority. If you do, outpatient treatment could be a good fit. Otherwise, a residential treatment program where you will have a built-in system of support will probably be the most effective option.
Gateway Foundation is a national provider that has 17 convenient drug treatment centers in Illinois, Delaware and California to serve our patients in the places and communities they call home. We put our patients at the center of their substance abuse treatment—life-saving treatment that stays with them throughout their lives. Through individualized treatment, we’re able to help them discover what will work best for them in their journey to overcome drug and alcohol addiction.
Genetics make up about 50% of the risk for alcohol dependence, but they by no means tell the whole story. Genetic history is often hard to distinguish, but if parents are regular heavy drinkers, or they drink to reduce stress and depression, it is likely that their children will grow up believing that these behaviours are normal and possibly harmless. But environmental influence doesn’t come only from the home; peer pressure from friends, colleagues and partners can also encourage new and difficult patterns of drinking which can lead to dependency or co-dependency.
This guide is written for individuals, and their family and friends, who are looking for options to address alcohol problems. It is intended as a resource to understand what treatment choices are available and what to consider when selecting among them. Please note: NIAAA recently launched the NIAAA Alcohol Treatment Navigator. This online tool helps you find the right treatment for you — and near you. It guides you through a step-by-step process to finding a highly qualified professional treatment provider. Learn more at https://alcoholtreatment.niaaa.nih.gov.
The first stage is occasional use or binge drinking. This usually involves experimentation. If you like the taste or the way alcohol makes you feel, you might choose to drink again. However, at this stage, you can still exert control over your drinking, even if you do drink more than the recommended weekly amount. You might think that occasional binge drinking is harmless, but the reality is that it can have a negative impact on your health and put you at risk of alcohol poisoning. Furthermore, if you continue to binge drink regularly, it can lead to a bigger problem.
The risk of relapse in drug addiction recovery is substantial, and that makes outpatient aftercare programs vitally important for newly-sober individuals, as well as for those working to maintain their recovery. Regular therapy sessions and 12-step (or alternative) peer group meetings can provide much-needed guidance and moral support to people in the midst of making major lifestyle changes, and family participation in ongoing relapse prevention programs can boost their effectiveness even further. While aftercare programs don’t guarantee permanent wellness, they can significantly decrease the likelihood of relapse and make it easier for recovering addicts to get back on track if and when they slip.
This group of potent pain-relieving substances includes all drugs that are derived from opium, a compound found in the opium poppy. Some of these drugs, like morphine and codeine, are classified as non-synthetic opiates, while others, like heroin, hydrocodone, methadone, and oxycodone, are produced synthetically in laboratories. Until recently, heroin was considered to be the most addictive of the opiates. Today, however, opiate pain medications have surpassed heroin and cocaine in their popularity as drugs of abuse. According to Harvard University, the number of opiate addicts in the US increased threefold between 1991 and 2001, largely because of the increase in nonmedical use of drugs like hydrocodone (Vicodin), oxycodone (OxyContin, Percocet) and hydromorphone (Dilaudid). Harvard estimates that as of 2007, approximately 2 million people in the US were dependent on opiates, a number that continues to increase. Inpatient Drug Rehab in Florida - Beachway Therapy Center
Individual therapy will help you learn to recognize triggers and cope with them. The therapists may also help you to improve your emotional regulation skills in order to better avoid relapse. Group counseling provides you with the opportunity to practice sober social skills, as well as the coping strategies you learned in individual counseling. Family therapy sessions can help to repair broken relationships, improve communication skills, and build conflict resolution skills. Medication, such as methadone or Suboxone, may be used in combination with behavioral therapy to help opioid-addicted individuals remain abstinent. Once your rehab program nears an end, your treatment team will create an aftercare or relapse prevention plan for you consisting of ongoing support. Ongoing support may include individual therapy, group counseling, self-help group meetings (e.g., 12-step, SMART Recovery), alumni programs, or sober living homes.1,2

Commitment and follow-through are key. Recovering from alcohol addiction or heavy drinking is not a quick and easy process. In general, the longer and more intense the alcohol use, the longer and more intense the treatment you’ll need. But regardless of the treatment program’s length in weeks or months, long-term follow-up care is crucial to your recovery.
When you are unable to stop using your drug of choice despite a desire to live without addiction, when you experience physical withdrawal symptoms when you attempt to stop getting high, when you crave your drug of choice and obsess about getting more – these are just a few characteristics of active drug addiction. Because it is a medical disorder, it is recommended that those who are diagnosed with the disease get immediate treatment that includes medical detox and psychotherapeutic treatment.
Founded in 1971, we are dedicated to helping guests and their families achieve and maintain recovery. We are a 99-bed, private, nonprofit substance use disroder treatment center nestled on 120 tranquil acres in Greensboro, NC. We provide treatment and evidence-based programs based on abstinence and the 12-step model of recovery. We have been accredited by the joint commission since 1974 as a specialty hospital. We are committed to providing exceptional, compassionate care to every individual we serve. Alcohol Rehabilitation and medical Facilities
Nalmefene, an opiate antagonist that is similar in its chemical structure to naltrexone, is one of the most recent drugs being investigated for the treatment of alcoholism. Like naltrexone (sold as ReVia, Depade, or Vivitrol), nalmefene deprives the person struggling with substance use of the pleasurable feelings associated with drinking. But nalmefene is less toxic to the liver than naltrexone. As of 2013, nalmefene was still undergoing clinical trials through the U.S. National Institutes of Health before receiving FDA approval. From Rehab to a Body Bag | Dying for Treatment: VICE Reports (Full Length)
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