Drugs affect the way a person thinks, feels, behaves and how they look. But substance use disorders are often accompanied by co-occuring mental health disorders like anxiety or depression. Some people may use drugs as a form of self-medication for these issues, while other people may develop a mental health disorder after taking substances. Either way, it’s important to look out for psychological and behavioral changes in friends or loved ones who might be struggling with addiction: Drug rehabilitation
Another common misconception about rehab is that every clinic is the same, or that there is only one type available. However, as you’ll see below, there are at least seven types of drug rehab available, ranging in intensity from support groups to inpatient rehab. The option that you choose will have a lot to do with the severity of your addiction, mental state, and other factors.
According to the Addiction Center, moving into a sober living home after treatment is often the difference between going back to old habits or continuing on the path of sobriety. Sober living homes are not as rigorous as inpatient facilities. They are often secondary treatments used in conjunction with other programs, as opposed to primary options.
Inpatient addiction treatment focuses on stabilization and assessment of your health to ensure you are ready--physically, psychologically and emotionally--to learn about core recovery concepts and to begin practicing recovery principles. Each day, you will be given a schedule of treatment activities, appointments and services tailored to meet your specific recovery needs and goals. Learn more about what happens in a typical day of inpatient addiction treatment. Robin Williams: Alcohol, Cocaine, & Rehab

Partial hospitalization is the next step in the continuum. Intensive outpatient programs are also available. These programs usually include a full schedule of therapy and drug treatment throughout the day, with the ability for clients to return home at the end of the day. Some rehab facilities offer partial hospitalization programs with on-site housing.
Treatments and attitudes toward addiction vary widely among different countries. In the US and developing countries, the goal of commissioners of treatment for drug dependence is generally total abstinence from all drugs. Other countries, particularly in Europe, argue the aims of treatment for drug dependence are more complex, with treatment aims including reduction in use to the point that drug use no longer interferes with normal activities such as work and family commitments; shifting the addict away from more dangerous routes of drug administration such as injecting to safer routes such as oral administration; reduction in crime committed by drug addicts; and treatment of other comorbid conditions such as AIDS, hepatitis and mental health disorders. These kinds of outcomes can be achieved without eliminating drug use completely. Drug treatment programs in Europe often report more favorable outcomes than those in the US because the criteria for measuring success are functional rather than abstinence-based.[24][25][26] The supporters of programs with total abstinence from drugs as a goal believe that enabling further drug use means prolonged drug use and risks an increase in addiction and complications from addiction.[27]
With non-medical inpatient treatment, clients are still monitored throughout detoxification, and transition to addiction rehab — but with a reduced level of medical supervision and the absence of medication therapy. To find an outpatient program that works for you or your loved one, visit The Recovery Village’s substance abuse and recovery list, or use a search engine to find “outpatient drug rehab near me.”
Drug addiction starts with drug use. Experimental use, recreational use, social use, occasional use, medical use – any use of an addictive substance for any purpose can and often does lead to a dependence upon that drug. While any and all drug use has the potential for harm, the most dangerous type of drug use in terms of the likelihood that it will lead to addiction, is the type that stems from a desire to numb pain or negative feelings or to cope with problems in one’s life. Addiction Treatment Center Serenity Oaks Wellness Center 844 720 6847
Stimulants, such as tobacco, cocaine or prescription amphetamines, stimulate the brain and nervous system, causing increased alertness. Depressants, such as barbiturates and benzodiazepines, slow activity in the brain and nervous system, causing relaxation. Hallucinogens, such as LSD and PCP, drastically disrupt the way the brain and nervous system communicate, causing hallucinations. Rehab: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)
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