Addiction is a chronic disease characterized by drug seeking and use that is compulsive, or difficult to control, despite harmful consequences. The initial decision to take drugs is voluntary for most people, but repeated drug use can lead to brain changes that challenge an addicted person’s self-control and interfere with their ability to resist intense urges to take drugs. These brain changes can be persistent, which is why drug addiction is considered a "relapsing" disease—people in recovery from drug use disorders are at increased risk for returning to drug use even after years of not taking the drug. Kevin's Struggle with Alcohol | True Stories of Addiction | Detox to Rehab
If someone you love has a drinking problem, you may be struggling with how to help them and how to avoid being overwhelmed. You are probably feeling a combination of anger, fear, shame, and sometimes even guilt. At times, it may seem easier to ignore the problem. But denying it will only cause more damage to you, your family, and the person drinking. I hope some of these suggestions will help.

When a person receives a diagnosis of alcoholism, the next important step is getting that person to appropriate alcoholism treatment. Unfortunately, there is a variety of reasons alcoholics are reluctant to seek treatment including, the belief that therapy will not work, fear of being stereotyped and complete denial they have a problem at all. The first thing alcoholic individuals and their loved ones should understand is that alcoholism is a disease. In addition, just as some diseases cause pain, alcoholism produces responses such as fear of withdrawal and severe cravings. It is also good for alcoholics to understand that treatment can be challenging but that it is all worth it to achieve a successful recovery. Intervention by a loved one is usually a turning point for alcoholic individuals, often providing them with the motivation to seek the help they need. While it is important an alcoholic's loved ones express their support, they will also need to be firm in their insistence that the person seeks treatment.


Changes in the brain that support physical and psychological dependency on mind-altering substances are the direct cause of addiction, but those changes do not occur at random. Addiction experts believe drug addiction emerges from an interplay of genetic and environmental factors, although one factor or the other may be strong enough to make a person vulnerable to addiction in some instances. Overcome Any Addiction: Dopamine Receptor Repair & Addiction Healing (sound therapy)
Alcohol is considered safe in moderation, but when occasional use becomes more common and begins to interfere with everyday life, it is typically classed as abuse. The UK Government’s guidelines on alcohol consumption states that no more than fourteen units of alcohol should be consumed by adult men and women each week; which means that consuming a large amount at one time (binge drinking), may still be considered abuse, without it being a regular occurrence. Drug Rehab Near Me
There are many places to turn for help. Not everybody requires medically supervised detox or an extended stint in rehab. The care you need depends on a variety of factors, including your age, drug-use history, medical or psychiatric conditions. In addition to doctors and psychologists, many clergy members, social workers, and counselors offer addiction treatment services.
Detox centers are intended to treat drug and alcohol addiction. One of the many benefits of detoxing at a rehab facility is that it’s safer than at-home detox. The reason is that it’s supervised by medical professionals who can monitor any withdrawal symptoms, some of which can be very painful. They typically include specialized programs, such as those at The Recovery Village, in addition to medications and other treatment methods to aid in recovery. Inpatient detox centers provide the highest level of supervision and medical monitoring of any type of detox center.
"The most robust finding in the study is that those receiving any medication did much better than those who received no pills at all," says Professor Barbara Mason, Scripps Research Institute, and an author of the study. "This should be a wake-up call. With less than one percent of those seeking help for alcohol dependence receiving a prescription, medication is underutilized. Medication for alcoholism can offer patients an advantage for their recovery, especially in a real-world setting."
Stimulants, such as tobacco, cocaine or prescription amphetamines, stimulate the brain and nervous system, causing increased alertness. Depressants, such as barbiturates and benzodiazepines, slow activity in the brain and nervous system, causing relaxation. Hallucinogens, such as LSD and PCP, drastically disrupt the way the brain and nervous system communicate, causing hallucinations. Rehab: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)
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