Drug abuse takes a financial toll on all Americans. The use of illicit drugs such as heroin, cocaine, meth and ecstasy costs the U.S. $11 billion in health care. According to the U.S. Department of Justice, total yearly costs in terms of hospitalization, emergency medical care, lost work productivity, premature death and criminal behavior surpassed $193 billion in 2007.
Just under 20 percent of American alcoholics fall into this category. They are usually in their 30s to 50s, financially stable, and employed. Most are well-educated. About a third have a family history of alcoholism, and some have a history of depression. Because they are able to maintain an appearance of success, many do not seek help unless the consequences of their drinking force them to confront their condition.
When a person receives a diagnosis of alcoholism, the next important step is getting that person to appropriate alcoholism treatment. Unfortunately, there is a variety of reasons alcoholics are reluctant to seek treatment including, the belief that therapy will not work, fear of being stereotyped and complete denial they have a problem at all. The first thing alcoholic individuals and their loved ones should understand is that alcoholism is a disease. In addition, just as some diseases cause pain, alcoholism produces responses such as fear of withdrawal and severe cravings. It is also good for alcoholics to understand that treatment can be challenging but that it is all worth it to achieve a successful recovery. Intervention by a loved one is usually a turning point for alcoholic individuals, often providing them with the motivation to seek the help they need. While it is important an alcoholic's loved ones express their support, they will also need to be firm in their insistence that the person seeks treatment.
Treatments and attitudes toward addiction vary widely among different countries. In the US and developing countries, the goal of commissioners of treatment for drug dependence is generally total abstinence from all drugs. Other countries, particularly in Europe, argue the aims of treatment for drug dependence are more complex, with treatment aims including reduction in use to the point that drug use no longer interferes with normal activities such as work and family commitments; shifting the addict away from more dangerous routes of drug administration such as injecting to safer routes such as oral administration; reduction in crime committed by drug addicts; and treatment of other comorbid conditions such as AIDS, hepatitis and mental health disorders. These kinds of outcomes can be achieved without eliminating drug use completely. Drug treatment programs in Europe often report more favorable outcomes than those in the US because the criteria for measuring success are functional rather than abstinence-based.[24][25][26] The supporters of programs with total abstinence from drugs as a goal believe that enabling further drug use means prolonged drug use and risks an increase in addiction and complications from addiction.[27]

Another example of CBT would be teaching the patient how to respond to the triggers that might once have tempted them to drink. It could be as straightforward as learning to decline an invitation to consume an alcoholic beverage. For a casual drinker, this is not an issue at all; for someone who had an intense psychological desire to drink, saying “no” can seem like the hardest challenge in the world, but that is how CBT can help turn a recovering addict’s life around.
Although Ecstasy declined in popularity after its introduction to the underground club scene in the 1980s and 1990s, a new generation of young users has discovered the drug. Many teens and young adults perceive Ecstasy as a non-addictive, relatively harmless psychedelic drug. However, Ecstasy can cause dangerous side effects, including nausea, vomiting, high blood pressure, dehydration, liver and kidney damage, an irregular heartbeat, and aggressive impulses.
Scientific research since 1970 shows that effective treatment addresses the multiple needs of the patient rather than treating addiction alone.[citation needed] In addition, medically assisted drug detoxification or alcohol detoxification alone is ineffective as a treatment for addiction.[3] The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) recommends detoxification followed by both medication (where applicable) and behavioral therapy, followed by relapse prevention. According to NIDA, effective treatment must address medical and mental health services as well as follow-up options, such as community or family-based recovery support systems.[5] Whatever the methodology, patient motivation is an important factor in treatment success.
The first step in recovery is deciding if you have a problem. This can be difficult, because your addicted-self will try hard to convince you that you don't have a problem. This is where a trained professional can gently help. They can keep you from tricking yourself and prevent you from slipping back into denial. They are trained to look for signs of trouble.

During the early stages of alcohol recovery, patients can be confused and scared. Their emotions can run high to the point that what they are thinking and feeling interferes with recovery. Meditation addresses these sorts of things. By helping patients relax and focus their thoughts inward, meditation eases patient fears and clears up confusion. Patients are more apt to benefit from treatment in this more relaxed state.
Alcohol addiction treatment at Priory is delivered as part of a comprehensive Addiction Treatment Programme. Our Addiction Treatment Programmes typically last for 28 days, and consist of you staying at one of our nationwide hospital sites on a residential basis, for the duration of this time. During treatment, you will have the opportunity to undergo a medically assisted withdrawal detoxification process if this is required, before undergoing intensive individual and group addiction therapy in order to address the source of your addictive behaviours, increase your self-awareness and take steps towards recovery. Whilst 28 days is the recommended treatment time for alcohol addiction, treatment lengths at Priory can be flexible according to your unique needs, requirements and commitments.
The cost of inpatient rehab programs depends on the treatment center selected, the level of clinical care recommended, and the length of time in treatment. The amount you pay will also depend on whether you’re able to access insurance benefits to help cover the cost or you’re paying out-of-pocket. Hazelden Betty Ford is in-network with most insurance carriers, and most of our patients use their health insurance benefits to help cover treatment costs. Insurance policies and benefits vary greatly, so it's important to check with your provider about coverage specifics in your case. As a nonprofit treatment center, Hazelden Betty Ford offers patient financial assistance funds as available, on a limited basis, to help offset the cost of addiction treatment for qualifying patients.
6. Finally, supportive social services – During this final step of alcohol rehabilitation, rehab staff help empower a patient by connecting her/him with services outside the treatment facility in order to maintain abstinence from alcohol and begin to create a network of supportive people to influence in the patients life. These services can include housing, health care, social service, child care, or financial and vocational counseling.
A good residential treatment programme takes mental health seriously. Facility staff recognise that the mental health of patients will be impacted by treatment one way or the other. As such, they do everything they can to ensure that the impacts are positive. Remember, one of the goals of residential treatment is to treat patients holistically. That means treating them in body, mind, and spirit.

Alcohol addiction treatment at Priory is delivered as part of a comprehensive Addiction Treatment Programme. Our Addiction Treatment Programmes typically last for 28 days, and consist of you staying at one of our nationwide hospital sites on a residential basis, for the duration of this time. During treatment, you will have the opportunity to undergo a medically assisted withdrawal detoxification process if this is required, before undergoing intensive individual and group addiction therapy in order to address the source of your addictive behaviours, increase your self-awareness and take steps towards recovery. Whilst 28 days is the recommended treatment time for alcohol addiction, treatment lengths at Priory can be flexible according to your unique needs, requirements and commitments. How to Quit Drugs Without Rehab - Are Drug Addiction Rehab Facilities Even Effective Long Term?

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