Developing a drug addiction isn’t a character flaw or a sign of weakness, and it takes more than willpower to overcome the problem. Abusing illegal or certain prescription drugs can create changes in the brain, causing powerful cravings and a compulsion to use that makes sobriety seem like an impossible goal. But recovery is never out of reach, no matter how hopeless your situation seems. With the right treatment and support, change is possible. Don’t give up—even if you’ve tried and failed before. The road to recovery often involves bumps, pitfalls, and setbacks. But by examining the problem and thinking about change, you’re already well on your way.
As alcohol abuse progresses from dependency to addiction, your need for alcohol will become increasingly overwhelming. You may start to spend more and more of your time drinking or thinking about drinking, leaving little time for anyone or anything else. This can affect your ability to take care of responsibilities at home and work, and can have a negative impact on your relationships with family members, friends, and work colleagues.
According to the Addiction Center, moving into a sober living home after treatment is often the difference between going back to old habits or continuing on the path of sobriety. Sober living homes are not as rigorous as inpatient facilities. They are often secondary treatments used in conjunction with other programs, as opposed to primary options.
Within the framework of the 4th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV), substance dependence is redefined as a drug addiction, and can be diagnosed without the occurrence of a withdrawal syndrome.[6] It was described accordingly: "When an individual persists in use of alcohol or other drugs despite problems related to use of the substance, substance dependence may be diagnosed. Compulsive and repetitive use may result in tolerance to the effect of the drug and withdrawal symptoms when use is reduced or stopped. This, along with Substance Abuse are considered Substance Use Disorders."[7] In the DSM-5 (released in 2013), substance abuse and substance dependence have been merged into the category of substance use disorders and they no longer exist as individual diagnosis.[8] 12 Steps of AA with Father Martin    YouTube WMV V8

NIDA recommends that any type of drug addiction treatment last at least 90 days; in fact, they find that shorter treatment lengths demonstrate limited effectiveness.11 Studies have demonstrated that the people who stay for 3 months or longer typically have better outcomes.12 So, while the initial investment of time can seem daunting, longer treatment lengths pay off.
^ Jump up to: a b c d e f Mattick RP; Digiusto E; Doran CM; O'Brien S; Shanahan M; Kimber J; Henderson N; Breen C; Shearer J; Gates J; Shakeshaft A; NEPOD Trial Investigators (2004). National Evaluation of Pharmacotherapies for Opioid Dependence (NEPOD): Report of Results and Recommendations (PDF). National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre, Sydney. Commonwealth of Australia. ISBN 978-0-642-82459-2. Monograph Series No. 52. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2011-03-09.

According to the results of a survey published in the Archives of General Psychiatry, approximately 2.6 percent of American adults meet the criteria for drug dependence and drug addiction. Globally, the figure is similar; the World Health Organization estimates that nearly 3 percent of adults around the world suffer from a drug use disorder. At first glance, these numbers may seem small. However, these statistics do not reflect the number of people who have tried illicit drugs, or who have abused illicit substances or prescription medications. The National Institute on Drug Abuse reports that almost 10 percent of American adults have tried illicit drugs. Anyone who uses drugs recreationally or experimentally is at risk of developing dependence and drug addiction.
We understand that withdrawal is uncomfortable. We also realise that the unpleasantness of withdrawal is that which persuades a lot of alcohol addicts to forgo treatment. The staff at our treatment facilities do their best to make patients as comfortable as possible and to help them through the difficult moments of withdrawal. The good news is that withdrawal is only temporary. It will eventually pass if you are willing to let it run its course. What Science Tells Us About Addiction Treatment

The National Institute of Mental Health defines depression as a common but serious mood disorder that causes severe symptoms that can affect how you feel, think and handle daily activities. These symptoms must be present for at least two weeks in order for an individual to be diagnosed with depression. In many cases, depression and substance abuse occur simultaneously. Sometimes depression precedes substance abuse, and other times, the reverse is true. In addition to facilities that treat substance use and co-occurring disorders, there are various inpatient facilities for mental health alone. As an inpatient for depression, you can receive individualized care at The Recovery Village. Step 1 of the 12 Steps for Recovery from Addiction | Guided Meditation
Inpatient addiction treatment focuses on stabilization and assessment of your health to ensure you are ready--physically, psychologically and emotionally--to learn about core recovery concepts and to begin practicing recovery principles. Each day, you will be given a schedule of treatment activities, appointments and services tailored to meet your specific recovery needs and goals. Learn more about what happens in a typical day of inpatient addiction treatment.
Integrated treatment is comprehensive programming that offers all of the therapeutic resources necessary to help the individual heal physically, mentally, and spiritually. There is no one cause of addiction, though living with a mental health disorder may increase the likelihood of developing a substance use disorder — and vice versa. Everyone is different. In some cases, a mental health disorder predates the development of a drug abuse. In other cases, mental health symptoms are not apparent until after addiction has taken hold — sometimes, these conditions are exacerbated or worsened by drug use.
For many people struggling with addiction, the toughest step toward recovery is the very first one: recognizing that you have a problem and deciding to make a change. It’s normal to feel uncertain about whether you’re ready to make a change, or if you have what it takes to quit. If you’re addicted to a prescription drug, you may be concerned about how you’re going to find an alternate way to treat a medical condition. It’s okay to feel torn. Committing to sobriety involves changing many things, including:
In 2001, David Sinclair, Ph.D., a researcher in Finland claimed an 80 percent cure rate for alcohol dependence when anti-alcohol drugs Revia or Vivitrol are prescribed according to his Sinclair Method. Dr. Sinclair's research has been published in the peer-reviewed journals Alcohol and Alcoholism and the Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology. The Sinclair Method is the standard treatment protocol for alcohol dependence in Finland, the method is also used in the U.K., but the method has yet to catch on in the United States. 
After occasional use comes alcohol abuse. This stage involves more frequent use of alcohol and you may be drinking more than the recommended amount on a regular basis. You might start drinking for more than just social reasons. Maybe you are drinking alcohol to make you feel better or different. You might be using it to boost your confidence or to alleviate feelings of stress or anxiety. This can lead to a cycle of abuse and an emotional attachment to alcohol.
However, other elements – for example the type of therapies available – may lie completely beyond your understanding and experience. With this in mind, it is always advisable to speak with an addiction specialist who will almost certainly be able to think of things which may not occur to you but which could be very important. By leveraging the vast experience of an addiction specialist you can be sure that issues of great importance will not go unaddressed.
Addiction is a complex but treatable condition. It is characterized by compulsive drug craving, seeking, and use that persists even if the user is aware of severe adverse consequences. For some people, addiction becomes chronic, with periodic relapses even after long periods of abstinence. As a chronic, relapsing disease, addiction may require continued treatments to increase the intervals between relapses and diminish their intensity. While some with substance issues recover and lead fulfilling lives, others require ongoing additional support. The ultimate goal of addiction treatment is to enable an individual to manage their substance misuse; for some this may mean abstinence. Immediate goals are often to reduce substance abuse, improve the patient's ability to function, and minimize the medical and social complications of substance abuse and their addiction; this is called "harm reduction".
Gateway Foundation is a national provider that has 17 convenient drug treatment centers in Illinois, Delaware and California to serve our patients in the places and communities they call home. We put our patients at the center of their substance abuse treatment—life-saving treatment that stays with them throughout their lives. Through individualized treatment, we’re able to help them discover what will work best for them in their journey to overcome drug and alcohol addiction. Brene Brown Knows! Toxic Shame & Trauma in Addiction Treatment w/ Gerald Loren Fishkin
Even if you are aware of the harm that prolonged heavy drinking causes to the body, you will tend to believe that you would never let it get to that stage because you would be sure to stop long before then. But the truth is that drinking causes great harm to the body long before you can see the effects, and the most serious consequences might not be that far off. An idea of the extent of the negative health impacts of drinking can be seen in the NHS finances, which show that alcohol consumption is responsible for over 10% of the cost of healthcare in Britain. Beatings and addiction: Pakistan drug 'clinic' tortures patients
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