Your first step is to call our Patient Access Team for a confidential phone assessment. You will talk with a recovery expert who will determine whether drug or alcohol treatment is needed and, if it is, will recommend the appropriate level of care and work with you to coordinate insurance benefits. If alcohol or drug addiction is not clearly indicated or if you’re not ready to commit to an inpatient stay, you can learn more about your situation and possible next steps by participating in one of our residential evaluation programs. Residential evaluations typically involve a four-day stay at one of our treatment centers where a number of screenings and assessments will help to identify your particular needs and challenges.
When it’s time to take action, finding the right drug rehab facility can become a daunting task. Most people turn to the internet with search engine inquiries like “rehab centers near me” or “local drug rehab.” Finding a center close by can be helpful, but your search may also offer results for programs that require travel. Inpatient drug rehab centers away from home can offer more opportunities for healing in a new environment.
Before taking Antabuse you should give your doctor your entire medical history. You may not be a able to take Antabuse if you have a significant medical history of heart or blood vessel disease, diabetes, an underactive thyroid, brain disorders (e.g., seizures, brain damage), kidney disease, liver disease, a history of severe depression, a history of psychosis, or a history of suicide attempts. Antabuse can alter the metabolism and blood levels of certain drugs, especially tricyclic antidepressants, Dilantin (phenytoin), coumadin, isoniazid, and theophylline.
Stimulants, such as tobacco, cocaine or prescription amphetamines, stimulate the brain and nervous system, causing increased alertness. Depressants, such as barbiturates and benzodiazepines, slow activity in the brain and nervous system, causing relaxation. Hallucinogens, such as LSD and PCP, drastically disrupt the way the brain and nervous system communicate, causing hallucinations. Rehab: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)
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