For example: As a result of heavy traffic, a recovering alcoholic may decide one afternoon to exit the highway and travel on side roads. This will result in the creation of a high-risk situation when he realizes he is inadvertently driving by his old favorite bar. If this individual is able to employ successful coping strategies, such as distracting himself from his cravings by turning on his favorite music, then he will avoid the relapse risk (PATH 1) and heighten his efficacy for future abstinence. If, however, he lacks coping mechanisms—for instance, he may begin ruminating on his cravings (PATH 2)—then his efficacy for abstinence will decrease, his expectations of positive outcomes will increase, and he may experience a lapse—an isolated return to substance intoxication. So doing results in what Marlatt refers to as the Abstinence Violation Effect, characterized by guilt for having gotten intoxicated and low efficacy for future abstinence in similar tempting situations. This is a dangerous pathway, Marlatt proposes, to full-blown relapse.
Are you seeking an inpatient rehab center near you? There are hundreds of residential rehabilitation centers (inpatient rehab facilities) all over the country. The Recovery Village has various outpatient and inpatient treatment centers locations throughout the U.S. To find an inpatient facility near you, refer to the following Local Rehab Resources page, which allows you to narrow your search by city and state.
Scientific research since 1970 shows that effective treatment addresses the multiple needs of the patient rather than treating addiction alone.[citation needed] In addition, medically assisted drug detoxification or alcohol detoxification alone is ineffective as a treatment for addiction.[3] The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) recommends detoxification followed by both medication (where applicable) and behavioral therapy, followed by relapse prevention. According to NIDA, effective treatment must address medical and mental health services as well as follow-up options, such as community or family-based recovery support systems.[5] Whatever the methodology, patient motivation is an important factor in treatment success.
Many successful drug and alcohol rehab programs include members of your family in your treatment program. Research has shown that including family and friends in the educational process significantly improves rehab outcomes. Some programs include family members and friends throughout the entire rehab process, from the initial assessment through continued follow-up aftercare.
Some addicts may require a detoxification cycle before beginning addiction treatment. This is perhaps one of the most significant misconceptions of drug rehab. Many people assume that detoxification is standard practice and is the “only” thing that occurs in a rehabilitation clinic. However, this is not the case. Drug rehab clinics seek to address the root problem to help break the long-term cycle of addiction.
State and local governments often offer rehab information and resources for local facilities and programs through their substance abuse or behavioral health divisions; the organizations to contact can be found through the Directory of Single State Agencies (SSAs) for Substance Abuse Services. In addition, the federal government’s Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Agency (SAMHSA) provides an online search engine that can provide guidance to those seeking a facility.
Getting alcohol out of the addicted person’s system is the first part of recovery. People with a severe alcohol addiction can experience intense withdrawal symptoms. A supervised alcohol detox is usually necessary for people addicted to alcohol to prevent potentially fatal complications. Shaking, sweating, seizures, and hallucinations are possible alcohol withdrawal symptoms. Woman Turns to Rehab After Struggling With Drugs, Alcohol: Part 1
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